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7Mar/130

The fine line between “Big Data” and “Big Brother”

The was never a lack of desire to collect as much data as possible on the part of business or governments; it was capabilities that always got in the way. With advent of "Big Data" technology the barrier had just been lowered.

Monitoring employees interactions in minute detail to analyze patterns, and get ideas on productivity improvements is not illegal per se...but it takes us one step further towards this proverbial slippery slope.

The recent article in The Wall Street Journal by Rachel Emma Silverman highlights the indisputable advantages but somehow glosses over the potential dangers:

As Big Data becomes a fixture of office life, companies are turning to tracking devices to gather real-time information on how teams of employees work and interact. Sensors, worn on lanyards or placed on office furniture, record how often staffers get up from their desks, consult other teams and hold meetings.

Businesses say the data offer otherwise hard-to-glean insights about how workers do their jobs, and are using the information to make changes large and small, ranging from the timing of coffee breaks to how work groups are composed, to spur collaboration and productivity.

 

[06.17.2013] Here's a blog post addressing the very same issues by Michael Walker, with benefit of hindsight after revelations on PRISM surveillance program: http://www.datasciencecentral.com/profiles/blogs/privacy-vs-security-and-data-science